2014-04-18 / Sports

Rockaway Outdoors

By Capt. Vinnie Calabro

Thursday morning sliding down the creek, the temperature gauge on the Furuno sonar read 47 degrees. Ouch. Any hopes of encountering fish diminished somewhat, but still we figured we do a little prospecting throughout the bay in search of warm water.

The usual haunts were visited on both the north and south side of Jamaica Bay but it was an exercise in futility. After two and a half hours of cruising it was apparent the only person prospering on this day was Mr. Hess; boat rides use fuel. So having drunk two cups of tea, and downing a bagel or two or three, we headed toward the dock vowing to give it a break for awhile.

The ‘awhile’ lasted till the next day and our spirits were renewed as the water temperature jumped to a steamy 50.8. However once again we got the reality check of the aftermath of a cold winter. Not much in the way of fish or even bird life but that can change and were hoping off this moon something will develop.

“Off this moon” now there’s an interesting phrase, for novices I’ll explain.

Fishermen to a certain extent are moonies. That is, they follow the lunar phases each month. The reason being that the moon controls the tides and with each tide ones hopes are, dare I say, aroused. Tidal flow brings water to and from the bay carrying with it temperature variances and movement of all manner of things that swim; baitfish and predators alike.

Full moons coincidently have the strongest impact on tides. Add to that some southerly winds and the recipe for fish is developing.

Tuesday morning yet another pilgrimage to the bridge and finally before the wind came on a few bass to 18 inches were caught and gently released. Also the shore bird population seemed to increase.

Upfront in the ocean, were an occasional ling and flounder for those diehards venturing on the head boats, but in no appreciable numbers.

Until the next tide…….

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