2013-04-12 / Community

Going Up: The “A” Train Wall

By Dan Guarino


In Broad Channel 40-foot sections of steel sheet piling are being driven into the ground to form a protective wall along the A train line. In Broad Channel 40-foot sections of steel sheet piling are being driven into the ground to form a protective wall along the A train line. Residents of Broad Channel have reported a not entirely welcome change to the east side of their island’s landscape.

Over the last several weeks a steel wall has been rising up steadily between the town and the rest of Jamaica Bay and the Rockaways. As part of the Metropolitan Transit Authority’s plan to protect the A train tracks from future storms, each panel projects seven feet out of the ground.

As reported by Wave correspondent Katie McFadden, each 40-foot sheet of A690 steel is being pounded in by a massive pile driver. The 33-feet of the wall below ground is meant to reduce the risk of erosion and anchor the wall in case of severe storm surges, tides and winds.

One Broad Channel driver noted a continuous line of flat-bed trucks carrying the steel plates, usually as many as eight at a time, have been parked along Cross Bay Boulevard just off the Joseph P. Addabbo Bridge.


Channel residents have raised concerns as the 7- foot steel wall rapidly rises and cuts off the natural beauty of the Bay. Photos by Dan Guarino Channel residents have raised concerns as the 7- foot steel wall rapidly rises and cuts off the natural beauty of the Bay. Photos by Dan Guarino “Oh, yeah,” he said, they’re there at least six days a week. They’re working right along on that thing.

Noting the necessity of protecting the subway infrastructure and the island, he commented, “Look, we got hit hard by Hurricane Sandy. We are still recovering. We get it.”

“But,” he added, pointing to the beauty of Jamaica Bay rapidly disappearing behind the rising wall, “is this the best way to do it?”

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