2012-09-07 / Community

Tri-State Area Flocks To The Shorebird Festival


Shorebird expert Kevin Karlson gives a presentation on the finer points of identifying some the 35 different species of shorebirds that visit the refuge each year. Shorebird expert Kevin Karlson gives a presentation on the finer points of identifying some the 35 different species of shorebirds that visit the refuge each year. More than 160 people attended last week’s 7th Annual Shorebird Festival at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and were treated to sightings of many species including a rare white pelican. Groups from Connecticut and New Jersey came to hear presentations by experts Lloyd Spitalnik and Kevin Karlson on shorebird behavior and biology as well as how to identify them in the field. “This was our best and biggest festival” said Don Riepe of the American Littoral Society who co-sponsored the event with Gateway NRA and NYC Audubon. “There were good numbers of migratory species at the East Pond including black-bellied plovers, short-billed dowitchers and greater yellowlegs.“ Each summer, the pond is lowered to create a mudflat to provide habitat for the thousands of shorebirds migrating along the Atlantic coast on their way to Central and South America for the winter. For information about upcoming field trips to the refuge call 718-318-9344 or e-mail: donriepe@gmail.com.



Shorebird lovers Elizabeth Man-clarke (L.) and Dylan Edmonds of the American Littoral Society hike the mudflats of the refuge in search of sandpipers. Shorebird lovers Elizabeth Man-clarke (L.) and Dylan Edmonds of the American Littoral Society hike the mudflats of the refuge in search of sandpipers.

With large scopes and binoculars, birding groups from the tri-state area enjoy the shorebird viewing at the East Pond of Jamaica Bay. With large scopes and binoculars, birding groups from the tri-state area enjoy the shorebird viewing at the East Pond of Jamaica Bay.

About 1,500 semi-palmated sandpipers rest on a dock in Broad Channel before continuing their long journey southward. About 1,500 semi-palmated sandpipers rest on a dock in Broad Channel before continuing their long journey southward.

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