2012-04-06 / Top Stories

Ulrich’s Participatory Budgeting Process Comes To An End

$1.3M Will Fund Nine Projects Chosen By Voters In Rockaway And Broad Channel
By Nicholas Briano


Photo Attached: Councilmember Eric A. Ulrich (third from right), with District 32 Participatory Budgeting Project participants (L-R) Danny Ruscillo, Bernie Feuer, Karen Sloan-Payne, John Cori, Rev. Eleni Marudis, Brian Heffernan, Vivian Carter, and Joe Hartigan. Photo Attached: Councilmember Eric A. Ulrich (third from right), with District 32 Participatory Budgeting Project participants (L-R) Danny Ruscillo, Bernie Feuer, Karen Sloan-Payne, John Cori, Rev. Eleni Marudis, Brian Heffernan, Vivian Carter, and Joe Hartigan. Councilmember Eric Ulrich, along with local residents and representatives of the Participatory Budgeting Project and Community Voices Heard, announced the results of the pilot Participatory Budgeting project in Council District 32. Residents of Broad Channel and the Rockaways cast their votes last week (March 25-31) in a pilot project to decide how $1 million in capital funds will be spent in the district for Fiscal Year 2013.

Ulrich announced that nine projects, totaling $1,372,000, will be funded this year as a result of the vote, in which 1,639 residents of Broad Channel and the Rockaways took part. Ulrich was pleased with the outcome of the process.

“It’s safe to say the results exceeded everyone’s expectation,” he said. “It was an opportunity to engage my constituents and give people a say on how their money was spent. And now they had a direct say.”

According to numbers provided by Community Voices Heard, 80 percent of the 1,639 voters lived in Rockaway or Broad Channel for at least eight years with more than half (60 percent) living here for atleast15 years. There were seven other projects considered that did not receive enough votes to be funded under the participatory budgeting allocation. Those projects, Ulrich did point out, still have a chance to be funded through discretionary funding in the next City Council budget. Some projects not making the cut, with around 300 votes each, were playground restorations, shade structures in Broad Channel and on the boardwalk and additional trash receptacles along the boardwalk and beach.

Participatory Budgeting in New York City is a pilot project which began last fall, in which Ulrich and three other councilmembers pledged to allocate $1 million in capital funds for the fiscal year 2013, as determined by the public. Neighborhood Assemblies, held in late 2011, were attended by several hundred local residents, and generated hundreds of project ideas. Volunteer “budget delegates” researched the project ideas and met in committees, to determine which projects were feasible, and would best serve the needs of the community.

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Agreed. The group that could

Agreed. The group that could lobby the most bodies to vote took the lion's share of the loot. The security cameras are a good idea with the rise in Rockaway crime. It's a shame no one showed the Rockaway dogs any love. Looks like they're stuck with a very dry future at the Freeway dog run.

I find these nine projects

I find these nine projects absurd outside of the technology for students, cameras for 100th PCT. This money was supposed to go towards revitalizing and making our community a better place.


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