2011-12-02 / Community

Levine Lands Top Hospital Slot

Former PHC CEO Sticks With MediSys
By Howard Schwach


In April, Bob Levine, right, receives a check from local attorney Joe Mure from the proceeds of the Little North Pole. In center is Dr. Constance Stewart, who runs the juvenile dia- betes unit at the hospital. In April, Bob Levine, right, receives a check from local attorney Joe Mure from the proceeds of the Little North Pole. In center is Dr. Constance Stewart, who runs the juvenile dia- betes unit at the hospital. The controversial former CEO of the Peninsula Hospital Center has landed on his feet, earning a top position with MediSys, the healthcare company that operated the center until August.

Under the MediSys management, PHC was on the verge of closing down and is now going through bankruptcy proceedings, after it was taken over by Revival Home Health Care and infused with $8 million in operating funds.

Robert Levine, who came under fire during the facility’s closure crisis and made an unceremonious exit in September, has been appointed chief operating officer of Flushing Hospital Medical Center, another hospital operated by MediSys Health Network.

“With these appointments, MediSys brings the collective decades of these individuals’ experience and expertise to key positions in our organization,” MediSys CEO Bruce Flanz said in a prepared statement.

But Levine’s soft landing outraged many Peninsula employees, especially after roughly 50 workers were laid off last month.

Dr. Wayne Dodakian, a hospitalist fellow at Peninsula, told the Daily News that Levine’s hire raises questions about how he secured the position given his recent track record.

“Peninsula Hospital almost closed under his watch,” Dodakian said. “This position that Levine now holds raises suspicions in one’s mind as to why he has that job after Peninsula almost closed under his administration.”

MediSys officials declined to comment on Levine’s hire.

Meanwhile Peninsula’s new CEO, Todd Miller, is still trying to guide the cash-strapped hospital through bankruptcy proceedings.

There is a divide over how much the 1199 SEIU union will be compensated, Miller told the News.

“Until we resolve matters with 1199 we’re not going before the [bankruptcy] judge,” he said.

Thus far, Peninsula has been able to survive by revamping the old billingand collection system, which Miller said “wasn’t particularly well-managed.”

Miller says that Peninsula has yet to receive the $8 million loan from Revival, but he estimates that Peninsula will need access to those funds by mid- December, adding a sense of urgency to the upcoming December 5 court hearing.

“There is no good reason to delay any further,” he said. “We really have to move forward.”

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