2011-08-05 / Top Stories

New Group Seeks to Save Rockaway’s Beaches

By Howard Schwach


New group had a rally on Wednesday night. The group’s signs tell of their goal. New group had a rally on Wednesday night. The group’s signs tell of their goal. Rockaway resident John Cori has a goal that he believes will serve all Rockaway residents well.

Cori wants to save the beaches.

To do that, he has formed a new group that he calls “Friends of Rockaway Beach.”

The group held it’s first rally to save the beaches on at Beach 92 Street on Wednesday night and, although the heavy rain kept the crowd numbers down, Cori got significant support from surfers, environmentalists and civic activists, as well as from a few of the political candidates seeking the Rockaway vote on September 13.

“We want to bring attention to the massive erosion of the beaches on the Rockaway peninsula and to let our elected officials and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers know that we really care about our beaches and we want to see them replenished and protected,” Cori said at the rally.


Rockaway activist Joe Hartigan (left) with John Cori at the rally. Rockaway activist Joe Hartigan (left) with John Cori at the rally. Cori is concerned that the federal money that former Congressman Anthony Weiner got to study the problem and come up with a long term solution is gone along with Weiner.

“There should have been a public scoping meeting this summer, and now nobody at the Corps of Engineers seems to know anything about the study,” he told The Wave.

The project was designed to study the shoreline of the Rockaway peninsula from Beach 19 Street to Beach 149 Street. The objective of the study was to “find a long term, cost effective solution to the effects of continued erosion [of the beaches] on the Rockaway peninsula.”

Over the years, the Corps of Engineers has used sand taken from the East Rockaway inlet in Far Rockaway to fill in small sections of the beach.

In 2007, for example, the beaches from Beach 28 Street to Beach 38 Street were replenished.

In 2009, Beach 28 Street to Beach 39 Street were replenished.

Then, in 2010, the area from Beach 92 Street to Beach 103 Street were replenished.

Cori, however, thinks that a long term solution would have to include groins and jetties, not just replenished beaches.

“This piecemeal solution is no solution at all,” he says. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of Sand.

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