2011-01-21 / Top Stories

New Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Plan For Atlantic Shores

By Howard Schwach


Unlike the Atlantic Sea Island proposal, Liberty Natural Gas will have no port structure to obstruct the horizon or interfere with marine life. The company says that no storage facility is required, since the gas is converted on the ship in a closed-loop system and delivered onshore to existing storage and energy production facilities. Unlike the Atlantic Sea Island proposal, Liberty Natural Gas will have no port structure to obstruct the horizon or interfere with marine life. The company says that no storage facility is required, since the gas is converted on the ship in a closed-loop system and delivered onshore to existing storage and energy production facilities. A Canadian energy company and a privately held New York firm are looking to build a deep-water natural gas pipeline 15 miles off the New Jersey coast and about 30 miles south of the Rockaway shoreline.

The plan comes in the wake of an announcement late last year that the Atlantic Sea Island Group had pulled its request to build a large man-made Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) island only 15 miles off the shore of Rockaway.

The company said that it had put its plans on hold due to the economy, the veto of the project by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and the fact that the public had turned against such projects in the wake of the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Those considerations did not stop the Liberty Natural Gas Transmission Project, however.

The $550 million project is being touted by the companies as a clean energy source with minimal environmental impact that won’t be visible from the shore.

The new plan does not call for a massive man-made island on the surface of the ocean.

Under the proposal by Excalibur Energy, a joint venture between the New York-based Global LNG Inc. and Canadian Superior Energy Inc., the pipeline would stretch about 50 miles and have four underwater turrets on the seabed 15 miles due east of Asbury Park. Buoys attached to the turrets would hook up to supply ships.

The liquefied natural gas carried by the ships would be re-gasified onboard and pumped through the turrets into the pipeline, the company said.

The pipeline would head north around Sandy Hook and reach land in the area of South Amboy or Perth Amboy, using some existing lines to get to Linden, according to project spokesman Steven Some.

Congressman Anthony Weiner, who fought against the Atlantic Sea Island project, has called on the U.S. Coast Guard to hold hearings on the plan in Rockaway.

“ To better understand the potential ramifications we need hearings in the affected communities — including the Rockaways,” Weiner said in a January 18 letter. “If we are going to make an informed decision, my constituents need to hear the proposal’s details directly from the responsible federal agencies and the company placing the pipeline.”

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