2010-12-17 / Top Stories

Doggie-Poo Cops Remain On Duty

By Howard Schwach

Anna Stanczyc says that she was battered by two police officers who accused her of not picking up after her dog. Anna Stanczyc says that she was battered by two police officers who accused her of not picking up after her dog. The two police officers who allegedly attacked a Rockaway woman because she would not pick up after her dog remain on duty while the police department’s Internal Affairs Bureau investigates the incident, police officials say.

“The incident is being investigated by the IAB and the officers remain on active duty status,” Sergeant Carlos Nieves, a spokesperson for the department’s Deputy Commissioner for Public Information, told The Wave on Monday.

Neither of the cops, Shaun Grossweiller or Richard DeMartino, both of whom are assigned to the 100 Precinct in Rockaway Park, was available for comment.

The incident under investigation took place on November 26, the day after Thanksgiving.

Anna Stanczyc, 49, who lives on Shore Front Parkway, said that she was doing her daily dog walk at approximately 8:20 a.m. on November 26 at Beach 87 Street and was returning to her apartment building when a police car pulled up and Grossweiler and DeMartino got out and accused her of not picking up the poop generated by her dog.

“I had a plastic bag in my hand, and I explained to them that my dog did not poop, that it just peed in the street,” Stanczyc said. “I walk my dog every day at the same time, and then I go to St. Rose on Beach 84 Street. I don’t have much time, and the dog just peed. I showed the cop the plastic bag I use to pick up poop and the dog’s license on her collar.”

She said that Police Officer DeMartino looked around on the grass and found some poop.

“It was old poop, it was already cold,” Stanczyc said. “I told the cop that it was not from my dog, that it was old and cold, but he ordered me to pick it up.”

Stanczyc said that she picked up the poop and expected to get a ticket from the cops, even though the poop was not from her pet.

“I told [the cops] that I didn’t do anything wrong, and they got angry,” she said. “They started to handcuff me behind my back. They pushed me and said that I was under arrest.”

She said that she struggled with them because she had dropped the dog’s leash and it was wandering away.

“Help my dog, somebody,” she said she yelled to some neighbors who were watching the action. “Help my dog.”

She added, “The cops pushed me into the back seat of their car, banging my head, and they started punching me in the face and breast.”

She admits that she used her legs in an attempt to keep the cops from closing the car door, angering them, before they began beating her, but she told The Wave that she was only trying to get somebody to take charge of her pet terrier, Psotka – Polish for “prankster.”

The cops took Stanczyc to the Peninsula Hospital Center, where she was treated and released to the two officers. Then, she was transported to Queens Central Booking, where she was charged with resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

After spending a night in court, she was released on her own recognizance and her case was adjourned in contemplation of dismissal. If she remains clean until May, the charges will be wiped from the slate, court officials say.

Her attorney, John Norinsberg, said that in his 20 years as an attorney, he had never seen another case where such extreme force was used under similar circumstances.

“This is an extreme case of outrageous conduct and there was no justification for beating an unarmed, handcuffed civilian, who was defenseless under their blows,” the attorney said.

Police sources say that detectives from the IAB spoke with Stanczyc on Thursday, December 9, after the story broke in the papers. The sources say that the investigation may take some time.

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