2010-09-10 / Letters

DOT Trashing Our Roads

Dear Editor,

Just when you thought the Department of Transportation couldn’t get any stupider they somehow find a way. First they eliminated a perfectly good lane in each direction on Cross Bay Boulevard between Broad Channel and Howard Beach. These happened just weeks after the Rockaway and Broad Channel communities expressed their strong opposition to this misguided plan. I’d love to hear someone at the DOT try to explain why three lanes are appropriate through a busy, congested town like Howard Beach yet not through a two mile stretch of road with nothing around it.

That was bad enough, but then they eliminated the third lane of what was a nice, wide Joseph P. Addabbo Memorial Bridge (formerly the North Channel Bridge). Why did DOT spend over $60 million of the taxpayers’ hard-earned money to build this beautiful, three-lane bridge when they now say we only need (deserve?) a two lane bridge? Daily traffic of almost 25,000 vehicles is now squeezed into two artificial lanes instead of the wide three lane bridge that was designed, built and paid for.

So what else could DOT possibly do to destroy and downgrade the very infrastructure that they are supposed to improve? Well apparently the black paint they used to cover the white lines that had marked the three north – south lanes wasn’t good enough, so they decided to spend more money and damage the Boulevard even more. DOT grinding machines were used to remove the offending black paint and in the process, left long, deep scars in what had been a smooth surface. These low spots will be prone to collect water and become a safety hazard during the cold winter months. This breech in the blacktop could eventually lead to potholes, unless of course the DOT gets even dumber and decides that it needs to repave the entire roadway.

DOT, please leave our roads and bridges alone. Every time you touch them you make them worse.

RICK HORAN

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