2010-06-18 / Community

Pheffer And Titus Unveil Music Booth

Pheffer and Titus Unveiling At Queens Library Pheffer and Titus Unveiling At Queens Library New York State Assemblymembers Michele Titus and Audrey Pheffer unveiled a new vocal booth with a recording computer and three computerized editing stations at the Queens Library for Teens. They were joined by New York State Senate President Pro Tempore Malcolm Smith. The booth, which was built and installed with $50,000 in funds secured by the Assemblymembers, allows the teens who use the library to produce and record music and spoken word. Through learning to operate the equipment in the booth, users also enhance their computer and math skills. The tour was conducted by Queens Library CEO Thomas W. Galante.

Queens Library for Teens, on Cornaga Avenue and Beach 21 Street, is open to young adults, ages 12-19 years old, every Monday - Friday from 2:30 - 6:00 p.m. Teens have access to more than 35 computers, video gaming, group homework help, weekly programs that include science, technology, literacy, math activities, socialization and vocation activities, college planning and the direction of dedicated Youth Counselors. On average 500 young people use the facility every week. Special events, such as a recent “So You Think You Can Dance” competition, are attended by hundreds, according to Pheffer and Titus.

“The Teen Library is an innovative and groundbreaking initiative for our teens. Through collaboration and working together, I and Assemblywoman Titus were successful in providing the opportunity for teens to have hands on experience recording music and music production,” said

Pheffer.

“I am so proud to have been able to make this educational and entertaining equipment possible, said Titus. The teens have given their stamp of approval. For once, we were able to give them what they asked for rather than just giving them what we want them to have.”

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