2010-05-21 / Community

Littoral Society Members Learn About Roses And Horseshoe Crabs

A group of Littoral Society members enjoyed the sight and smell of blossoming salt spray roses during a walk led by Jamaica Bay Guardian Don Riepe at Jamaica Bay last weekend. A group of Littoral Society members enjoyed the sight and smell of blossoming salt spray roses during a walk led by Jamaica Bay Guardian Don Riepe at Jamaica Bay last weekend. Spring is in full swing as the salt spray roses (Rosa rugosa) are in full bloom and the ancient horseshoe crabs are once again coming ashore to lay their eggs. And once again, the American Littoral Society and NYC Audubon are leading horseshoe crab walks along the shorelines of Jamaica Bay. Last weekend about 40 people attended the first walk. Although only a few crabs were present the beautiful roses and cherry trees were flowering and the colorful warblers, orioles and other birds were migrating through the area. “ The peak horseshoe crab egg-laying time will be at the end of May, during the full moon high tides “ said Don Riepe, the Jamaica Bay Guardian. “ The next scheduled walk is Sunday, May 30 at the Jamaica Bay Refuge.”

Horseshoe Crabs can’t hurt you” exclaims Riepe as he thrusts his hand into the horseshoe crabs mass of gently pinching claws. Horseshoe Crabs can’t hurt you” exclaims Riepe as he thrusts his hand into the horseshoe crabs mass of gently pinching claws. To reserve space call 718-318-9344 or e-mail: driepe@nyc.rr.com.
Many species of shorebirds migrating through Jamaica Bay depend on eating horseshoe crabs eggs in order to build up their depleted fat reserves. Many species of shorebirds migrating through Jamaica Bay depend on eating horseshoe crabs eggs in order to build up their depleted fat reserves.

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