2010-01-29 / Community

41st Street Community Center Receives $60,000

Sanders’ Allocation To Help Replace Materials Removed When Madison Left
By Miriam Rosenberg

Councilman James Sanders Jr. presents a $60,000 check to NYCHA Chair John B. Rhea (far right), 41st Street TA President Lizzie Brown (middle with glasses) and other NYCHA residents and staff members. Councilman James Sanders Jr. presents a $60,000 check to NYCHA Chair John B. Rhea (far right), 41st Street TA President Lizzie Brown (middle with glasses) and other NYCHA residents and staff members. Three months after taking charge of the Beach 41st Street Community Center, the New York City Housing Authority now has the funds to replenish items that were removed from the center when it took over running it on October 19.

City Councilman James Sanders Jr. presented a check to NYCHA Chair John B. Rhea and members of the 41st Street Houses Tenants Association last Friday. “We’re trying to find a way to make something better than it was before,” said Sanders, referring to the Madison Boys & Girls Club, which operated the community center until October 16 of last year.

Madison Boys & Girls Club left the community center on October 17 after being unable to settle a monetary dispute with NYCHA. When they left, according to Rhea, the organization took whatever they owned with them.

Rhea said that after Madison Boys & Girls left the center, NYCHA worked with Tenants Association president Lizzie Brown “in putting together the wish list and then looking at what resources could be made available.

“We have specifically spent money on a number of the items that we need to reestablish in the community center that were not owned by NYCHA, that were part of the boys and girls club. They took their material, their resources, so we needed to replace that immediately.”

Rhea told The Wave that NYCHA has already bought many items and supplies and more – such as computers for the now empty computer room – are on the way.

“Unfortunately, it’s being done from scratch but we’re committed to it and we’re going to get it done,” said Rhea.

Some of the planned programming for the community center includes computer classes, homework assistance, sports, trips, arts and crafts, dance and other educational, cultural and recreational programs for young people ages 6 to 12 years old, teens and adults.

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