2009-03-06 / Letters

A Rockaway Tale

Dear Editor,

I was hanging on the boards in June of 1974 (Beach 113 Street) and somebody said "hey did you see the news? We are going to have to surf through ice floes in 20 years." This was brought on by the cover of Time magazine "Another Ice Age" http://www.time.com/time/magaine/- article/0,9171,944914,00.html. We were all thinking about it and wondering if we would be able to afford dry ducks (dry suits to the younger generation). Then school started and we worried about homework, girls, and how soon would we be able to get our learner's permit. We got older and there were no ice floes. It was never brought up again. Twenty years goes by and someone said "gee" it "seems" hotter doesn't it? It was actually the same temperature as it was twenty years earlier, but it "seemed" hotter. This was heard by people on the next block and soon it was all over Belle Harbor. It died down after awhile. I left NY in 1975 to find my way in life and got to California. Rockaway is better, but I digress. We were hanging on the beach (no boards to be had) and someone said "hey, it "seems hotter." Before you know it Mr. Smith goes to Washington and spreads the news that it "seems hotter" in California. (June 14, 1974, San Francisco, temperature 60° F, June 14, 1994 60° F).

A few years go by and the next thing you know, Washington is studying the trend on how hot it seems. (Who knew we were so smart). There was a consensus that it seemed hotter in Rockaway and we need to throw money at it and see what happens.

King Bloomberg hears about this study (http://www.edf.org/documents/ 493_HotNY.pdf) and comes to Rockaway to tell all of us how smart we were back then. The King states "A report stating that water levels around New York City could rise by more than two feet by century's end along with average temperatures increasing as much as 7.5 degrees."

I read that this morning and said "hmmm." I googled my morning away and found New York sea levels were rising an average of 2.5 per year. 2.5 what, you say. Wait for it. Millimeters. That's right there are several studies that indicate that, on average sea levels have risen an average, of 2.5 mm per year since 1856, http://www.stevens.edu/ses/- cms/fileadmin/cms/pdf/Vivien_Gorni tz.pdf, that is one inch per decade or 10 inches over the last 100 years. Now I do not know how accurate the computers and satellites were in 1856 so I can't state facts, but Ben Franklin must have had a little more than a key on that kite string and 80 years went by so they were probably state of the art by then. Computers and satellites had their breakthrough in the 1950's and 60's. By the 80's they were almost agonizingly slow. To me this makes all data before the 70's not comparable to now. But, I have been wrong before.

So, the King comes to town (with clothes) and cries "the sky is falling." We all say, what can we do? The King in his wisdom says "give me money and I will fix it (it may take a few more terms, but it's good to be King).

Nice fairy tale isn't it, or is it.

I understand that the earth has gone through several ice ages (before manmade CO2 emissions) and as I understand reality, if you went through several ice ages you also went through several warming trends. We all need to be thoughtful of our environment and take pain to "give a hoot and don't pollute" but, are we being conned?

The mainstream media seems to think it is OK that the King states that regardless of all the facts we have (facts are proven things while studies are what we think MAY happen) that he is right. The seas will no longer stick to the 150 year trend. We have a new trend that was brought forward by political donors. The seas will now rise 2.8 times as

fast and we will have to build a bubble over NY to protect us from the heat.

Let's look at the facts and make wise decisions.

BING STRASSBURG

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