2008-12-19 / Top Stories

Jail Time For Exposing Ex-Wife On Net

By Nicholas Briano

A former Rockaway Park college recruiter who posted nude photos of his ex-wife online and invited strangers to take part in a rape fantasy, pled guilty this week and faces up to five years in prison for first-degree identity theft and first-degree criminal contempt.

Thomas Gillen, 46, was sent to jail in February, 2008 on the same charges when he posted his ex-wife's pictures online, in violation of an earlier plea deal from 2006, when he originally committed the crime.

Gillen, currently residing in Maryland, will be sentenced on February 2, 2009 and faces a minimum of two and a half years in prison with a maximum sentence of five years.

"The victim in this case was left shaken and fearful after the man she was once married to betrayed her in such a devastating manner," District Attorney Richard Brown said. "She was left vulnerable and in harm's way by those who would deem to exploit the situation. His actions were illegal and contemptible and deserve to be punished."

According to Brown, as part of Gillen's guilty plea, he admitted that between November 2007 and July 2008, while in violation of the original plea deal, he assumed the identity of his ex-wife more than 1500 times on the Internet, in order to contact various men and engage in sexual conversations. In addition, he sent nude photos of her to them.

He also pled guilty to being in criminal contempt of a court order for violating the terms of a 2007 order of protection in which he was ordered to attend counseling and not impersonate his former wife by posting nude photos or pretending to be her on the Internet.

He had been sentenced to five years probation in the 2007 case. Gillen pled guilty earlier this year to violating that probation and was sentenced to one to three years in prison, which will run parallel to the sentence he receives in February.

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