2008-11-21 / School News

HS Report Cards: The Good, The Bad And The Non-Existent

Local Schools Get Mixed Reviews From DOE
By Howard Schwach

Far Rockaway High School, now part of this building called the Far Rockaway Educational Campus, was not rated this year because it is being phased out. The campus houses FRHS, three small high schools and a middle school. Far Rockaway High School, now part of this building called the Far Rockaway Educational Campus, was not rated this year because it is being phased out. The campus houses FRHS, three small high schools and a middle school. The Department of Education finally released the long-awaited high school progress reports last week, rating schools on a variety of criteria. The results for the four local schools were decidedly mixed.

Far Rockaway High School was not given a report card grade this year.

"The school is phasing out, and we don't rate schools that are in that process," said Andy Jacobs, a spokesperson for the DOE.

The 110-year-old school, now part of the Far Rockaway Educational Campus, will be closed in June of 2010, as soon as its last class graduates.

That will leave the campus with the Frederick Douglass Academy VI, which was rated this year, and two new high schools that were not rated, according to DOE officials. In addition, the campus houses the KAPPA VI middle school.

The other high schools in Rockaway are Beach Channel High School and the high school component of the Channel View School for Research (CVSR), housed at Beach Channel High School.

Pat Tubridy, the principal of the Channel View School For Research in a 2006 file photo. Tubridy's high school component received an A from the Department of Education. The school has a grade 6 to grade 12 organization. Pat Tubridy, the principal of the Channel View School For Research in a 2006 file photo. Tubridy's high school component received an A from the Department of Education. The school has a grade 6 to grade 12 organization. Officials say that the three other high school units in Rockaway, which include the Queens Institute for Research, Information and Technology; the High School for Medical Technology (both at the Far Rockaway Educational Campus); and a possible new high school unit at the Scholars' Academy, formerly JHS 180, may be rated next year or in 2010.

The Channel View School for Research received an A on its report card this year, one of the nearly 40 percent of city high schools that received the highest grade.

The school received a grade of 7.3 out of a possible 15 points in the "School Environment" category, based on surveys returned by students, parents and school staff.

It received 18.7 points out of 25 in the Student Performance category, based strictly on the highstakes standardized English Language Arts and Mathematics tests, and 45.3 points out of 60 points on the Student Progress category, which measures progress from one year to the next.

In addition, it earned 7 points of additional credit for doing well as matched against a group of similar schools, called peer schools.

CVSR's total score was 78.3 out of 100, putting it in the middle range of those schools that received an A.

Frederick Douglass Academy VI, a small school housed at the Far Rockaway Educational Campus, received a grade of B this year.

The school, which has 344 students, received 6.6 out of 15 for School Environment; 10.5 out of 25 for Student Performance; 31.5 out of 60 for Student Progress and 6 points for additional credit, for a total score of 54 out of 100, on the low side of the B category.

Beach Channel High School, with an enrollment of 1792 students, received a C on its report card.

The school received 3.3 points out of 15 for School Environment; 11.2 out of 25 for Student Performance and 22.7 out of 60 for Student Progress. In addition, it earned 1 additional credit, for a total of 38.2 out of 100. That put the school in the high range of those who earned C's, only 5 points from earning a B rating.

According to the DOE, 39 percent of the city's high schools received A's, 44 percent B's, 12 percent C's, 3 percent D's and only 2 percent F's.

Schools that get A's and B's are eligible for rewards from the DOE, while those that get D's, F's or three years of C's in a row face consequences, including a change in administration or even closing, DOE sources say.

Chancellor Joel Klein, who has made accountability a cornerstone of his administration, said that the high marks this year reflected a steadily improving graduation rate and that the report cards indicate how much he has been able to change the school climate.

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