2008-04-25 / Top Stories

DOS: Come Recycle Your Cell Phones

Sanitation Commissioner John J. Doherty is reminding Queens residents that the New York City Department of Sanitation's Bureau of Waste Prevention, Reuse and Recycling is teaming up with Verizon Wireless to collect old cell phones at its annual Electronics Recycling and Clothing Donation events this spring. Doherty is urging all New York City residents to donate their old, unused wireless phones to help survivors of domestic violence.

Queens residents are asked to bring their old phones to the recycling event on Saturday, May 3, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., rain or shine. The event will be held at St. John's University Alumni Hall parking lot, corner of Utopia Parkway and Union Turnpike; cars enter at Gate 4 on Union Turnpike and 175 Street.

All collected phones will be donated to the Verizon Wireless HopeLine® program, which will refurbish, recycle or sell the phones and donate the proceeds to domestic violence advocacy groups in the form of cash grants and prepaid wireless phones for victims. Phones that cannot be refurbished are disposed of in an environmentally sound manner.

"Joining forces with Verizon Wireless' HopeLine program creates a win-win situation for the residents of New York City," said Commissioner Doherty. "We're always interested in programs that encourage reusing items that otherwise might end up in the waste stream. When you donate your old phone to HopeLine, you'll not only give a product a second life - you'll also give a family in need a second chance at life."

The city has held three electronics recycling events so far this spring, in Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island. Collectively, nearly 9000 people have responded and recycled over 900 pounds of cell phones.

Verizon Wireless was the first wireless carrier in the nation to collect and recycle old cell phones and has done so since January 1999 - first in New York and then across the U.S.

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