2007-12-14 / Community

Far Rockaway Photos Of Yesteryear: Remembrances Of Things Long Past


Rockaway was a very different place in the 1950's than it is today. For one thing, the State Diner, a hangout for generations of Far Rockaway High School Students, stood at the corner of Mott Avenue and Beach Channel Drive, where McDonald's stands today. The diner was owned by the Procops family when this 1951 photograph was snapped. It was later renovated and then demolished to make way for the fast-food eatery. Rockaway was a very different place in the 1950's than it is today. For one thing, the State Diner, a hangout for generations of Far Rockaway High School Students, stood at the corner of Mott Avenue and Beach Channel Drive, where McDonald's stands today. The diner was owned by the Procops family when this 1951 photograph was snapped. It was later renovated and then demolished to make way for the fast-food eatery. The inside of the State Diner, typical for others of the same genre. A Wave editor remembers having breakfast in the diner, which was a local meeting spot for Boy Scout groups going on a camping trip. There was a strict seating plan at the diner on weekend evenings. The star jocks and their cheerleader dates always filled the back booths at the left of this photo. Others sat there at their peril. The inside of the State Diner, typical for others of the same genre. A Wave editor remembers having breakfast in the diner, which was a local meeting spot for Boy Scout groups going on a camping trip. There was a strict seating plan at the diner on weekend evenings. The star jocks and their cheerleader dates always filled the back booths at the left of this photo. Others sat there at their peril. There was a time that Rockaway had amenities such as movie theaters -  three of them to be exact, the RKO Columbia (pictured), the Strand and the Gem (later to be renamed the Pix). This 1957 photo was taken during the winter of 1957 at the corner of Central Avenue and Cornaga Avenue, looking north. One long-time Rockaway resident saw the photo and said that he had fond memories of watching vaudeville There was a time that Rockaway had amenities such as movie theaters - three of them to be exact, the RKO Columbia (pictured), the Strand and the Gem (later to be renamed the Pix). This 1957 photo was taken during the winter of 1957 at the corner of Central Avenue and Cornaga Avenue, looking north. One long-time Rockaway resident saw the photo and said that he had fond memories of watching vaudeville The Long Island Railroad station in Far Rockaway was a hub for commuters to Manhattan. At that time, in the 1950's, a railroad rider from Rockaway to Manhattan could travel in one of two ways. The commuter could take "the short way," which went over the Jamaica Bay trestle (currently in use by the A Line) and then through White Pot Junction in Forest Hills, directly to Penn Station. Or, the commuter could take "the long way," which went through the Five Towns, the route currently used by the railroad. The "long way" took about 35 minutes longer, but wound up in Grand Central Station. The Long Island Railroad station in Far Rockaway was a hub for commuters to Manhattan. At that time, in the 1950's, a railroad rider from Rockaway to Manhattan could travel in one of two ways. The commuter could take "the short way," which went over the Jamaica Bay trestle (currently in use by the A Line) and then through White Pot Junction in Forest Hills, directly to Penn Station. Or, the commuter could take "the long way," which went through the Five Towns, the route currently used by the railroad. The "long way" took about 35 minutes longer, but wound up in Grand Central Station.

Return to top

Since when did the LIRR go to Grand Central? I know of the future East Side Access, I think this a missprint.


Email Us
Contact Us

Copyright 1999 - 2014 Wave Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved

Neighborhoods | History