2007-09-14 / Community

SJEH Pastoral Education Gets Foreign Students

The clinical pastoral education students from the Bahamas gather with faculty between classes at St. John's Episcopal Hospital, including: (back row, left to right) Agatha Campbell, student; Rev. Jude Edomwonyi, student; Rev. Kendal Garfield Mackey, student; (center row, left to right) Father Daniel Weiscopf, auditor; Rev. Dr. Richard Liew, Director, Clinical Pastoral Education, Episcopal Health Services; Emmanuel Okpalomwaekwe, auditor; (front row, left to right) Susanna Mackey, student; Joan Sturrup, student; and Delores Rolle, student. The clinical pastoral education students from the Bahamas gather with faculty between classes at St. John's Episcopal Hospital, including: (back row, left to right) Agatha Campbell, student; Rev. Jude Edomwonyi, student; Rev. Kendal Garfield Mackey, student; (center row, left to right) Father Daniel Weiscopf, auditor; Rev. Dr. Richard Liew, Director, Clinical Pastoral Education, Episcopal Health Services; Emmanuel Okpalomwaekwe, auditor; (front row, left to right) Susanna Mackey, student; Joan Sturrup, student; and Delores Rolle, student. Rev. Dr. Richard Liew, the Director of Clinical Pastoral Education for Episcopal Health Services, Inc., based at St. John's Episcopal Hospital, is a pioneer in the development of indigenous clinical pastoral education.

Clinical pastoral education is an accredited training program that provides competency and consistency of training to those in the ministry and laity who provide care to the suffering in hospitals, mental institutions, prisons, parishes and communities. The clinical pastoral education movement began around 70 years ago in the United States. Dr. Liew has taken that training to other countries and interfaced clinical pastoral education to specific cultures and national contexts. To date, he has established indigenous clinical pastoral education programs in Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Italy, the Caribbean, Africa, and even one in the Bedford Hills maximum-security prison for women.

Now, he has seen the program come full circle, as six graduates of the CPE program in the Bahamas have come to study and experience a U.S. culturally based CPE training here, at St. John's Episcopal Hospital. One intern, Father Jude Edomwonyi, said, "I chose to come to this program for its international character. My intention is to come back for a one-year residency."

Another student, Pastor Kendal Garfield Mackey, said, "I learned of this program through Father Sebastian Campbell, founder and Supervisor of the CPE Centre in the Bahamas."

The clinical pastoral education program in the Bahamas began in March 2006 and is based at Princess Margaret Hospital.

Recognized by the Public Hospital Authority of the Bahamas, it is an affiliate of the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychtherapy in New York.

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