2007-07-27 / Community

Bullet Kills 22-Year-Old As He Looks Out Window

By Miriam Rosenberg

Urtez Burnett, 22, had his life cut short by a bullet as he sat looking out a window on July 19. Urtez Burnett, 22, had his life cut short by a bullet as he sat looking out a window on July 19. A chair by a window turned into a deadly perch for a 22-year-old Far Rockaway resident last week.

Urtez Burnett was shot once in his left eye as he sat by a second-floor window at his family's home on Beach 38 Street on the evening of July 19.

"He was slumped over in a chair in the window," said Damaris Gomez, a neighbor. "Whoever saw him would think he was sleeping."

Police found Burnett in that chair when they arrived on the scene.

There are no arrests and the investigation is still ongoing, but the crime scene was reopened on Wednesday. What is known is that there were some young men in the street before the shooting.

"There were three guys outside. We thought they were playing ball," said Gomez, adding that there is a basketball hoop by the house. "So, we paid it no mind. Then I heard something like someone banging on a door. One time. After that the kids left."

A white van - whose windshield, upon close examination, appears to have been damaged by bullets - was parked near the Burnett home. In an early report, neighbors told a reporter for The Daily News that someone had tried to steal the van, but it is not known if the vehicle is involved.

A memorial has been set up on the steps of the Burnett home. A memorial has been set up on the steps of the Burnett home. According to his cousin, Melissa Davis, Burnett spoke to his sister minutes before the shooting.

"He told her he was hungry," Davis told a New York Post journalist. "When she brought the food for him, she saw he him lying in the window dead."

Curwin Burnett, 25, told the Daily News that his brother, who already held down two jobs (one at JFK Airport), was planning to get his GED.

Family and friends cannot think of a reason why someone would want to harm the Guyanese immigrant.

"He never got into any trouble," said Curwin Burnett. Gomez said the children on the Davis said, "I think it was mistaken identity. They probably thought he was somebody else. He had no enemies." street lost a "big brother."

"Every night he would come home from work, he would spend time with the kids from the block teaching them basketball and football. I never saw him in a fight [or] angry. He was always smiling," continued Gomez. "His thing was the children of the block."

Return to top


Email Us
Contact Us

Copyright 1999 - 2014 Wave Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved

Neighborhoods | History