2006-04-14 / Letters

Letters

Shocked By Citation

Dear Editor,

I was shocked yesterday when I opened my mail to find a citation from the Department of Sanitation for having litter on my property.

It said "dirty area."

The details of the violation read, "At the place of residence I did observe accumulation of matted newspapers, cut bags scattered about in front yard area visible from the sidewalk."

I live on a corner house. My property is very well cared for. Due to strong winds trash from as far as two to three blocks away have landed on my property. I know that is the case because I have picked up envelopes and boxes with my neighbor's address on them.

I have spoken to some of my neighbors about the trash and asked them to contain their trash better. Sometimes when the wind is so strong I guess the wind just takes over. Right at the corner is a bus stop and I have noticed that there are some careless individuals who throw their coffee cups and bottles on my lawn. I am not capable of standing over them to police the area day and night. Instead I stand out and pick up the assorted trash that winds up on my property. I live alone. I have a very small amount of trash, as the sanitation men who pick up my garbage can attest. I am very careful to put out my recyclables.

I try to be a very good citizen. You can imagine my shock and frustration when I opened my mail with this citation telling me I would have to pay $100 when I had not picked up the papers that had blown to me yet that day. As you will remember March was a windy month. Now I have to find a way to go to the Queens building for the hearing next month. I am an elderly lady who is handicapped. I think it is a crime to put me in this situation when I am only trying to make life better by having a garden that can be seen from public view by having plants and trees and flowers to brighten everybody's day. Having this ticket suggests that it would be more appropriate to have a fence. Is that what we all want? Do we want to have fences?

SHARON RAWITZ

'Betrayed' By

Tribute Park Cupola

Dear Editor,

As seen in the March 31, 2006 edition of The Wave, Patrick Clark, with his stained glass, has quietly sneaked the Muslim stars and half a moon. The attack on the World Trade Center didn't even occur in the night. The Park is a tribute to the victims of Muslim terrorists. I, as a $100 contributor, feel betrayed. I wonder how the families of the victims feel like?

DAVID DOBLACK

Response To 'Guns 'R US'

This letter is in response to a cartoon printed in the 3/31/06 edition of the Wave.

Dear Editor,

What's this, a politically right cartoon in the Wave? The gun is pointed in the right direction, and the bullet is going the right way, and guns are the U.S...what would we have done without them?

I wouldn't want your artist beside me when the new oil war starts. He doesn't even know how to hold a gun. And case he is a leftist-oops! -a lefty, he would get his eye knocked out.

But I guess the only training he got was with a credit card! Like the Mayor! Ban criminals and guns would be no worry.

EMIL LUCEV

Battery Runs

Dear Editor,

MTA's NYC Transit has a policy of by-pass stations in what is known as a "Battery Run."

These runs are used supposedly to balance service.

When a Far Rockaway bound train goes non-stop from Broad Channel, it is assumed that there is a rush to get it there because it is needed to provide Manhattan service.

Battery Runs should only be used on rare occasion, but I presumably have been a "victim" of that device several times in the last month.

I caught a Far Rockaway "A" train at West 4 Street [in Manhattan] at about 3:26 p.m., five minutes after a Lefferts train went by.

Apparently, service was normal and that train arrived at Far Rockaway just after the uptown train departed. I had to wait seven minutes before going west.

My only conclusion is that the Line Superintendent was more concerned about "late trains" then he was concerned with customer service.

I retired [from the MTA] almost two years ago, but when I took the train home, I almost never ran into these "skips."About 100-200 people have to be inconvenienced to keep service satisfactory.

RONALD WEINFELD

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