2004-08-06 / Community

Looking Backward

What The Wave Said

20

Years Ago...

“Finally the infamous 15-19 Central Avenue has been closed!” cried residents of Far Rockaway when police from the 101 Precinct and an attorney from the city of New York began using the state’s new Padlock Law.

Far Rockaway-bound A Trains are not getting past Euclid Avenue subway station in Brooklyn from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every weekday. The CC Rockaway Peninsula Shuttle Train is running from Euclid Ave. to Rockaway Park-Beach 116 Street; and a shuttle bus between Holland and Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue. This will continue until August 24.

Division 21 of the Ancient Order of Hibernians will use more than $25,000 granted by the Area Policy Board to operate a year-round tutorial program for students in the community who need special assistance.

Peter G. Kramer, a multi-award-winning journalist and accomplished publicist, has joined the staff of The Wave as a contributing editor. A former Newsweek magazine associate editor and foreign bureau chief, Kramer will be writing special articles for The Wave, including investigative stories, personality profiles, editorials and opinion pieces.

Antique car exhibits have been added to other displays, demonstrations and performances arranged for the first Gala Fair of the Rockaways, set by the Rockaway Music and Arts Council, in Fort Tilden.

30

Years Ago...

Two Edgemere children drowned in Jamaica Bay at the foot of Beach 43 Street about 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The victims were a 10-year-old boy and an 11-year-old girl.

Threatened by the construction of a seven-story, 100-unit, multiple dwelling and parking lot at Lanett Avenue and Beach 6 Street in the Reads Lane area of Far Rockaway, some 300 homeowners attended a rally at the auditorium of the Torah Academy for Girls on July 30.

The committee for “Little Nick for Mayor” will sponsor an outdoor sing-along at Ed Noonan’s Inn at 818 Cross Bay Boulevard. Music will be by the Banjo Rascals.

The Rockaway Volunteer Ambulance Corps workers have been going door-to-door seeking funds to keep the ambulance going. They have been asking for donations of $5 per family.

40

Years Ago...

Although the windows of vacant stores are notoriously prime targets for stone-throwing hoodlums, somehow the windows in The Wave’s former office remained intact for three weeks, until the wreckers removed them.

“We meet Nassau County prices” reads a sign in front of a Far Rockaway business. That’s one way of saying, “we absorb the city sales tax.”

If the lack of proper parking is hurting business in Far Rockaway, why is it that the municipal parking field on Beach 21 Street usually has plenty of room? Part of the problem seems to be a lack if promotion by businessmen. They need more ads in The Wave.

Mayor Wagner and his two sons spent the weekend with President Johnson at the White House, but a great many other New Yorkers, including some in Rockaway, went to the World’s Fair where you couldn’t get into a parking lot on Sunday afternoon.

50

Years Ago...

The long awaited report on the proposed Title 1 Housing Project for Seaside will be delayed for at least two weeks and the expected Hammel report may not be ready for some time, according to a spokesperson for the Mayor’s Committee on Slum Clearance.

Forty-eight apartments will be ready for occupancy in mid-September when the first building of the Hammel low-cost housing project is completed, a spokesman for the New York City Housing Authority announced this week.

Grocer Harold Lupitsky was back in the hospital early this week for the third time in less than a year – he’s been the victim of an assault each time. This time, Lupitsky was robbed of $216 as he made his way to his store at 82-19 Boulevard.

The Rockaway Beach Tavern Owners Association drew up an eight-point code of ethics, which will go beyond the law to clamp down completely on the sale of liquor to minors.

Assemblyman J. Lewis Fox, member of the Joint Legislative Committee on Natural Resources, appeared before his committee in Albany yesterday to urge the passage of legislation which will prevent the bombardment of Long Island shores with dead fish and debris. This condition became serious in the past week when thousands of mossbunkers were washed up all along the Rockaway shoreline, creating an unbearable stench in many areas of the peninsula.

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