2004-07-30 / Community

Beachcomber

The Arverne Civic Association is holding an important meeting about the mosquito problem in Rockaway on August 9 at 7:30 p.m. at 330 Beach 67 Street. On hand will be Dr. Tom Friedman of the New York City Health Department. The association is asking the city to clean up Dubos Point (something that Friends of Rockaway president Bernie Blum has been asking for since the point became a park), cleaning all the catch basins in the area and spraying the area to kill the mosquito larva.

The Wave was in error last week in its update of American Airlines Flight 587 and its aftermath. The first home on the southeast corner of Neponsit Avenue and Beach 131 Street was formerly owned by the Concannon family and is now the site of a nearly-completed new home. The second home in that area, now under construction, is on the property formerly owned by the Pomponio (and we regret the incorrect spelling of the family name in the last issue) and is the third lot from the corner, not the second as we reported.

A Manhattan firm that delivers Internet pop-up ads has asked a judge to block enforcement of Utah’s new anti-spyware law. The company says that the ban on Internet intrusions is a violation of its First Amendment right of free speech. The Utah Legislature answered that it has a valid interest in prohibiting intrusions in Internet transactions. We hope that Utah wins, and that New York State passes a law of its own blocking the nasty and intrusive pop-ups. If you’re interested in such a ban, let Audrey Pheffer, Michelle Titus and Malcolm Smith know your feelings. This may be a winner for those who use the Internet and hate those pop-ups that clog their computers.

An off-duty firefighter who was driving his police officer brother’s car was given a $150 parking ticket for double parking on Beach 125 Street and the beach block while dropping off supplies and food for a coming barbeque. The firefighter swears that he was out of the car and in his brother’s house for only a moment while delivering the material and that the police officer must have come off the boardwalk, given him the ticket and then disappeared. “I know that double parking is not allowed there,” he said, “but there is no place else to park that the stuff I had to deliver was too heavy to walk a long distance.” He argues that allowances should be made for that kind of activity. In any case, the parking judge took that into account and reduced his fine.

“Rescue Me,” the new show on the FX cable network had its premier last week and we were impressed with the show and the fact that many of its locations were in Rockaway. The show is about a soon-to-be-divorced FDNY firefighter who lives across the street from his wife and three kids. Both of the homes in the show are, in reality, on Beach 143 Street in Neponsit. In addition, one of the seminal shots in the show was on the beach at sunrise. While many firefighters lauded the show it does not seem to an outsider to show the department in a good light. We look forward to the next episode in the limited run series. It airs at 10 p.m. each Wednesday night on FX. That’s Channel 58 on our local cable network.

Many locals have visited The Rockaway Museum for its “Playland Retrospective” exhibit since it reopened last month. The exhibit is chock full with maps, pictures and memorabilia of Playland’s heyday. The next exhibit, which will begin sometime after the first of the year, will focus on Far Rockaway High School. Museum officials are asking anybody with memorabilia from the high school’s early years to contact the museum through The Wave. All materials will be returned.

On a January night last year, the coldest night of the winter, four young men stole a boat (the New York Times said that they ‘appropriated’ the boat, but they stole it) from City Island in the Bronx, intending to row across the icy water with temperatures hovering in the single digits and winds whipping the bay. Their old boat began to sink and one of the men used his cell phone to call for help. All he got out was “We’re taking on water on Long Island Sound, near City I.” The dispatcher at the 911 system did not believe that there was enough information to dispatch an aviation unit. The boys died, and now their parents are suing the city. For once, the city is not giving in easily to the suit. The city claims the youths were culpable in their own deaths by “disregarding the obvious dangers of their escapade.”

It looks as if Snapple is not as popular in the schools as Mayor Mike Bloomberg thought the drinks would be. In 27 schools where the Snapple replaced admittedly less-healthy drinks, the machines took in $178,000 less this year than last, an average of more than $6,500 a school. A portion of that money went to fund school sports and other activities such as after-school programs. Under the contract, the city will have to make up the loss. To be fair, the majority of the 750 schools that have machines said that they did about the same amount of business as last year, although few reported a rise in revenues with the Snapple machines.

The Wave ran into West End Realty’s Barbara J. Morris at Pitch n Putt last week. “Watch, I’m going to get a hole-in-one,” Morris said enthusiastically as she stood on the second hole tee. “I might be lying!” she then added. Then, to the gallery’s astonishment, her tee shot went at the pin like it had a seeking device in it. The ball took one bounce on the green and cuddled up to the cup – stopping less than five inches out. No hole-in-one, but she had a gimme putt for a birdie. Nice work Barbara!

The city has decided to fight the ruling by the whacky federal judge who thinks that there is no reason to check anybody coming into the area where the Republican National Convention will soon be held. Judge Robert Sweet said the NYPD could not check personal bugs unless there was a “specific threat to public safety.” What was the World Trade Center?

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