2004-04-02 / Community

PHC Resident Earns Top Score

By Brian Magoolaghan
PHC Resident Earns Top Score By Brian Magoolaghan


Valeriy Kayrov, center, recently found out that he is tops among his peers at hospitals around the country according to the results from a November, 2003 exam. Also shown, Peter A. Guiney, D.O., left, and Aaron Nesoff, M.D. Family Health Services Department Director, right.Valeriy Kayrov, center, recently found out that he is tops among his peers at hospitals around the country according to the results from a November, 2003 exam. Also shown, Peter A. Guiney, D.O., left, and Aaron Nesoff, M.D. Family Health Services Department Director, right.

The chief resident at Peninsula Hospital Center recently earned the top score on a nationwide prep exam that indicates the strength of a hospital’s education programs.

Valeriy "Val" Kayrov scored a 176 on the November American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians Family Practice In-Service Exam.

"Nobody get more," Kayrov said proudly last week. His accent and syntax reaffirmed his Russian heritage. "It was very big pleasure for me to get this," he continued.

Kayrov has reason to be proud. More than 1,000 other residents at 116 hospitals throughout the U.S. took the exam – the average score was about 40 points lower than his mark. This does two important things for PHC:

"It reinforces the fact that we are an academic community hospital," said Peter A. Guiney, D.O., director of the Family Practice Residency Program. Kayrov’s score also reaffirms the decision to make him that program’s chief resident, Guiney added.

Kayrov completed his M.D. in 1980 at Zaporozhye State Medical Univer sity, in the Ukraine, and was a neurologist in his homeland for 17 years. He came to the U.S. in 1997 and earned his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree (D.O.) from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYIT) in 2001. For the last three years, he has been working with patients and preparing for his Board Certification Exam as a resident at PHC.

The Family Practice Program handles more than 35,000 patient visits a year and exposes residents to a variety of pathologic and physiologic disease states.

Guiney said a number of doctors with different backgrounds or from other parts of the world have been integrated to American medicine un der his supervision at the hospital. The goal, he said, is attracting top residents and then making them want to stay – and a high number of newly certified doctors have.

"That’s really the value of the program to the hospital [and the community] in the long run," Guiney said.

Kayrov didn’t say whether he would stay after he graduates the program in about two months, but he hinted that he wants to split his 60-plus hour workweek between private practice and teaching. Meanwhile, Guiney made no attempt to veil his desire to keep Kayrov at the hospital.

"He’s a star," Guiney said beamingly.


Return to top


Email Us
Contact Us

Copyright 1999 - 2014 Wave Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved

Neighborhoods | History

 

 

Check Out News Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with Riding the Wave with Mark Healey on BlogTalkRadio