2003-06-27 / Letters

Letters

Letters


The Fight For Educational Excellence

Dear Editor;

I reflect on the legacy that Goldie Maple leaves to challenge all who profess a love for children and belief in obtaining excellence for all children.

I recall the endless meeting and strategy sessions that Goldie organized to insure that children and parents of Community District 27 School Board received their equal share of educational resources.

She served with an unselfish commitment to speak for the parents and children, and even though, on many issues, her voice was not popular with the status quo, she never gave up the struggle. She was the founder of "Pass the World", a parent organization, which continues to provide information to parents.

The last meeting I attended with Goldie was a meeting at Congressman Gregory Meeks Far Rockaway office. At this meeting, Goldie volunteered to begin a summer project to work with the parents of MS 198 to address new school governance.

I appeal to elected officials, community leaders, religious leaders and parents to accept the challenge to work to improve the opportunity for educational excellence in local schools. The struggle must continue.

SARAH COLSON

Running Out Of Material

Dear Editor,

If I didn't know any better, I would say that Stephen Wohl is running out of material after reading his letter to Iran last week.

Many would say Bush & Co. used the Saddam's history as an escuse to declare war on Iraq. Wohl wrote Iran would be next ... even though the  US
government can't possibly find the perfect justification to do so like with
Afghanistan and Iraq.

Mr. Wohl, you may have made some credible points about Iraq, but your prophecy of an assault on Iran is as legitimate as Jesse Jackson's son. Why don't you focus on something new, like the 2004 election.

LANCE EUSTACHE

Enjoyed Day At Coney

Dear Editor,

What a wonderful, safe time my husband's Essam and I had recently in Coney Island, visiting Astroland and Demo's Wonder Wheel Park. We were there to help celebrate my son Nicholas' tenth birthday. His brothers Michael and John, along with family, friends, wee also present, to enjoy the lovely day.

We wish to thank the operators of the two great amusement parks, for their special courtesies and attention. It was very much appreciated.

My father, Frank Giordano, a long time pharmacist and civic leader in Coney Island, also joined us.

I can see why Coney Island can once again be called the "Playground of the World."

MARIA SAID

What's With Sanitation?

Dear Editor;

What is the problem with the Sanitation Department that they don't pick up the in front of our house? Are they getting to lazy to pick up the bags? We were told that you can only put six trash bags outside at a time per house. What is their problem? We never had a limit for 25 yrs. What should we do with the garbage? We pay them to pick up our garbage through taxes. Something needs to be done. People who have 2-family houses, what about Dayton Beach that has lots of garbage? Are they limited also?

 JOE MANZO

Top Ten Reasons...

Dear Editor,

Top ten reasons why it is more expensive to live in Rockaway than in Manhattan:

1. When you go to Dunkin Donuts in Manhattan and buy a medium coffee, it costs $1.39 per cup. When you go to Dunkin Donuts in Rockaway, and buy a medium coffee, it costs $1.39 per cup, plus a parking ticket for $105.00 when you park your car in front of the store on 116 Street.

2. When you buy a New York Post in Manhattan, it costs a quarter; when you buy a New York Post in Rockaway on 116 Street, it costs a quarter, plus $105.00 for the summons that you get for parking in front of 'Te Amo.....'

3. When you buy a slice of pizza in Manhattan, it may cost you $2.00. When you buy a slice of pizza in Rockaway, it may cost you $1.75 or $1.80, plus a parking summons for double parking on 129 St. in the sum of $105.00

4. When you go for a walk in the park next to the Hudson River on Saturday night, it doesn't cost you anything. When you go for a walk on the beach in Rockaway on Saturday night, after 11 p.m., it will cost you $50 plus court costs in the sum of $25.00 for a total of $75.00.

5. When you leave your home in Manhattan and take out the garbage and put it next to the curb, it doesn't cost you anything. In Rockaway, when you leave your home, and take out the garbage, and put it in the garbage can, and the lid blows off the garbage can, it costs you $70.00 for the fine because your garbage can was without a lid.

6. When you take your child to school in the morning, it doesn't cost you anything. In Rockaway, when you take your child to P.S. 114 in the morning, and you "park" your car or leave your car for a moment to walk your child into school to make sure he or she enters safely, it costs you nothing to deliver your child, plus a parking summons on Beach 134 Street, for illegally parking or standing in the sum of $105.00.

7. When you live in Manhattan, and take your child to karate lessons, it only costs you the fee for the karate lessons. In Rockaway, when you take your child for karate lessons, it costs you for the karate lessons, plus, the parking summons for $105.00 that you get from the traffic officers on Beach Channel Drive.

8. When you want to go fishing in Manhattan, you go to the Hudson River or the East River and catch a few fish (not that you would eat them). When you want to go fishing in Rockaway, you can go to the Bay Wall or Go Surfcasting on the beach and catch a few fish, but if they are the wrong kind, too big, too small, out of season, or too many for the day, the Department of Environmental Conservation will slap you with a summons: Cost of fish = $0 - cost of summons $250.00, plus court costs and the DEC officers will confiscate your fish! (So, you won't get to eat them either.)

9. If you attend a social function in Manhattan, and you were to walk outside, possibly with an alcoholic beverage in your hand to let's say, smoke a cigarette in compliance with the new no-smoking laws, a police officer driving by might look at you and keep driving. In Rockaway, if you were attending the parallel social function, and a police officer observed you, it would probably cost you the same amount for the gift for the person whose social function you were attending, plus $25.00 in court costs for receiving an "open container" violation, not to mention your day in the Queens Criminal Court.

10. If you lived in Manhattan, and went outside to help your building clear away the snow from in front of your residence, it wouldn't cost you anything, except maybe a few sore back muscles. If you live in Rockaway, and went outside to clear the snow away from the front of your building or home, and you shoveled some of the snow into the street to clear your walkway and sidewalk in compliance with the law requiring that you shovel, you could receive a summons for throwing snow in the street, and blocking a public thoroughfare which would set you back $150.00, plus, a bunch of sore muscles and a sore attitude.

.......Go figure!

S. AGRAMONTE

This Political Prostitute....

Dear Editor:

Does your City Councilman James Sanders, Jr., a member of the City Council, lie to you? He sends out flyers to you to your homes bugling the wonderful programs he has endorsed for this community. Did you know that he is a member of the political prostitute organization called the City Council? It was he, along with other city council members, who endorsed and voted for the Mayor Bloomberg property tax increase. It was he, along with other city council members that voted for and endorsed the doubling of sanitation fines.

He, along with other city council members, didn't offer a peep when the Commissioner of Sanitation John Doherty commanded by the Enforcement Director James Moss sent their storm troopers into your neighborhoods to rummage through your garbage to find an envelope so they could issue to you a mixed garbage fine. Where was his outcry? There was none because you Councilman James Sanders, Jr. are a rubber stamp for this Mayor Bloomberg who invented egregious double invasive sanitation fines upon the backs of small property owners.

This political prostitute tells you at voting time and by his PR flyers what he will do, and what he is doing for the people of the community. But in reality he is in bed with this mayor who is an enemy of the small property owner. The purpose of the underhanded terrorist sanitation fines is not to satisfy the quality of life. It is to satisfy the rape of the small property owner you. Where was Sanders' defense of you before the City Council when the Sanitation troops invaded your neighborhood? There was none, because he is part and parcel of this thievery.

We need an attorney to institute a class action against the thieves sitting in City Hall and Sanders is one of them who have acted with deliberate indifference against the people under color of law. We must revolt by flooding the courts with our protests.

ALBERT A. FRANKEL

Affirmative Action Necessary

Dear Editor:

Affirmative Action was instituted as a governmental attempt to rectify historical injustices and make amends for atrocities committed against enslaved Africans and their offspring in the United States.

Perpetrated by individuals, organizations and the government itself, these historical wrongs manifested in many shapes, forms and fashions and, in addition to slavery itself, include Jim Crow, political exclusion, taxation without representation, broken contracts (e.g. 40 acres and a mule), economic exploitation, genocide, lack of access to inferior education if any at all, abuse by law enforcement agents and judicial Affirmative Action was instituted as an effort to both recognize some of the wrong committed against a people and as an effort to affect some sense of fairness and balance or at least as a means to achieve fairness and balance.

Affirmative Action was an idea to create an equal playing field in a country where equal justice for all was supposed to be a given as it was intricately intertwined within the founding father's vision for the new nation. Never mind the fact that many, if not most, of their lives contradicted this idealistic notion of brotherhood for all because they were owners of human chattel-men, women and children-who worked ceaselessly to build this nation free of charge.

So in my little ole insignificant mind, Affirmative Action is about equity, reconciliation, rectification, making amends and equal access-- all of which are rooted deeply in Christian, Judaic and Islamic doctrines and teachings. So besides immoral atheists (there are some who have systems of morality) or straight our racists: who could possibly have a problem with Affirmative Action?

Next stop: reparations.

TIMOTHY AARON STYLES

Where's the Blotter?

Dear Editor;

For many years, Wave readers were able to review local arrests by reading the police blotter. We could see if criminal activity was close to our homes and get some idea of the priorities local police precincts were following.

In the past couple of months the Police Blotter has almost disappeared from the Wave. This is a loss to those concerned about the community.

With the current controversy over beach and boardwalk regulations it is essential that all concerned have a clear picture of the enforcement of these regulations and any resulting arrests and summonses. Can we again find the Police Blotter in the Wave?

NORMAN SILVERMAN

Thank You Principal

This letter was sent to the principal of Beach Channel High School by a student.

I was looking through the card section of Genovese and I realized that there was no card there that could show how appreciative I am for what you did for me. There are no words to describe how happy I am right now; you have made my day so much brighter. Now that I am eligible to walk down that aisle after spending four very long years in high school, it will be the experience of a lifetime. . It is only once in a lifetime that you graduate high school with all of your friends and your family there. When I would be in the halls you were always there interacting with the students, and you made our learning experience so much more interesting. Even though I never had the privilege of being in your class you sure made it clear that you can make anything happen if you keep your mind to it.

Mr. Marcus, you have made my three years at Beach Channel such a wonderful experience. You got along with the children and you were always on their level. You always made me laugh when I was in the worst of moods. Whenever I had a problem with English you always took time to help me out as well as the other students.

When you became principal you really reached out to the students, you made us feel like you understood us on every topic. Whenever there was a problem you always took time to solve it. You would bend over backward to help us. You always believed that the students were more important that any paperwork that had to be completed. You were a big inspiration to me and I am sure as you continue along with your career you will be an inspiration to other children. When I first came to the Channel you were one of the first few teachers I liked, you always made jokes and you never took things to seriously. I knew everyday that if I had a problem you would try your hardest to fix it

Mr. Marcus, not only were you an excellent teacher and principal, but you were also a great friend. You talked to the students on their age level, but at the same time as an adult. You pointed us in the right direction when we might have been thrown off. I am very honored to say that you were my principal and my friend at Beach Channel. As I move on to bigger and better things in life I will always look back on the memories I had at the Channel. I hope you keep in mind the best class that you had the honor of being principal of and that was the Class of 2003.

Thank you so much once again an you have really made a difference in our educational environment. You are a great person and friend; remember too keep up all the great work. LAURA CLARK


Return to top


Email Us
Contact Us

Copyright 1999 - 2014 Wave Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved

Neighborhoods | History