2003-02-01 / Front Page

Cashin To Lead Rockaway Schools

Bromme To Be Gone By March
By Howard Schwach

Bromme To Be Gone By March


Cashin will have approximately ten "instructional leaders," who report to her, each of who will be responsible for "clusters" of ten or twelve schools and the principals who run them.Cashin will have approximately ten "instructional leaders," who report to her, each of who will be responsible for "clusters" of ten or twelve schools and the principals who run them.

By Howard Schwach

Dr. Kathleen Cashin, formerly the Superintendent of School District 23 in OceanHill-Brownsville, will soon be leading the 35 thousand students in District 27 as well. Cashin was appointed on Monday to Chancellor Joel Klein’s "instructional board of directors" as the Regional Superintendent for Division Five.

That division is comprised of schools that were formerly in School District 27, District 19 and District 23.

District 27 Superintendent Matt Bromme has reportedly been reassigned to the Tweed Courthouse, the seat of government for the new Education Department. Bromme will become a senior manager who will report directly to one of the Deputy Chancellors. Bromme will reportedly leave the district by March 1 and will be in charge of zoning, variances and the Federal "No Child Left Behind Law" for the entire city.

Division Five, one of ten new school divisions, will include more than 100 schools with a total registration of more than 90,000 students.

The new division is an eclectic one, with 83 percent of the students being either Black or Hispanic.

And, while Cashin reportedly was credited by the Chancellor with raising reading scores in her "tough" district more than five points since 1999, a quick check of the district’s website reveals that only 27.2 percent of the district’s students met the reading standards on the most recent reading test and that more than 41 percent of the students in the district were "far below standard" on the most recent standardized Mathematics test.

Steve Greenberg, the President of Community School Board 27 remembers Cashin because she once was in contention for the position of district superintendent in this district. She lost out to Beverly Hall at that time.

Greenberg told The Wave on Tuesday that Cashin called him after her appointment.

"She seems to be reaching out to us," Greenberg said. "She promised that she would come to a Sunshine Meeting in the near future."

Greenberg said that he assured her, "that while our board is vocal in keeping the school board model in place, that he and the board would work with her to assure an orderly transfer."

He expects that the present District 27 office would become the new "Learning Support Center" for Division Five.

"It seems to me that the division configuration was based on the central location of our district office."

Greenberg is not happy with the configuration, however.

"We would have been better served to be in a district with other Queens schools rather than with Brooklyn schools," he says.

He hopes that both of the present Deputy Superintendents, Marty Weinstein and Michelle Lloyd-Bey, will wind up as supervisors in Rockaway schools.

"There will probably be two "clusters" of schools in Rockaway and the two of them are available," he says. "That would seem to be a natural fit."

Cashin will have approximately ten "instructional leaders," who report to her, each of who will be responsible for "clusters" of ten or twelve schools and the principals who run them.

One insider told reporters that the new job given to Cashin and the nine others is like "building a plane while you are flying it."

Many questions remain. The cream of Rockaway’s students have been recruited for the past several years by schools in Brooklyn’s District 21.

That district is now joined with Staten Island into the new Division Seven. Can students in Rockaway move from Division Five to Division Seven? That remains to be seen.

Cashin was unavailable for comment at press time.


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