2002-06-08 / Community

Sanders Wants Neighborhood 9/11 Memorials

Sanders Wants Neighborhood 9/11 Memorials

Councilmember James Sanders, Jr. has introduced, with the support of victims’ families groups, the first resolution to propose a memorial for all those who died in the 9/11 attacks.

The resolution, introduced at the June 5 Council meeting, calls upon New York City to invoke the spirit of the historic "Liberty Trees" by planting "Freedom Trees" in neighborhoods throughout the City to honor the memories of the men and women who died in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Other City Council members and Patricia Reilly, treasurer of the Coalition of 911 Families Group joined a press conference held recently.

Councilman Sanders, who chairs the Council’s Economic Development Committee, believes an appropriate memorial for those who were killed in the 9/11 attacks must be built an the World Trade Center site. Undoubtedly this will become a place to which people from across the region, country, and world will travel to remember the attack and honor its victims.

However, Sanders believes that there is also a need for communities to have their own gathering places – in their neighborhoods – where they can pay tribute to the fallen. This resolution is being introduced in support of that impulse.

During the 1760’s American patriots came together beneath "Liberty Trees" to unite in support of independence and freedom. These "Liberty Trees" were important patriotic symbols in U.S. history and were planted throughout the 13 colonies before and during the War for Independence as symbols of American Colonial solidarity.

Therefore, in the spirit of revolutionary heroes Samuel Adams, Thomas Paine, and Crispus Attucks, Councilman Sanders believes that the planting of these "Freedom Trees" would symbolize the solidarity of all New Yorkers against terrorism and for the causes of freedom and liberty.


Return to top


Email Us
Contact Us

Copyright 1999 - 2014 Wave Publishing Co. All Rights Reserved

Neighborhoods | History