1999-05-29 / Columnists

Beachcomber

"Rockaway, Queens, is a shabby seaside resort of boarding houses," said a report in last week’s New York Times. The same story, about the mentally ill, said the man accused of pushing another man onto the subway tracks had earlier refused to live in a Rockaway home.

 

 

Another daily paper provided a much more flattering item. Columnist Jack Newfield of the Post said Rockaway’s beaches were "more beautiful than Monte Carlo or Santa Monica" and listed the beaches among the top 100 great places in New York city. Of course, it was an obvious observation with which we couldn’t agree more.

 

That photo last week was of Dino Trivlis. He was helping the Belle Harbor Alliance with their graffiti removal effort.

 

The Wave’s assistant editor, John McLoughin, has been invited to be the keynote speaker at graduation ceremonies at PS 183. John impressed students and teachers at the school when he paid a visit to the school as a Wave rep.

 

Even if you favor the parking restrictions why must NO PARKING begin before 9 a.m. on Saturday? Starting it at midnight serves no purpose except to increase the hassle.

 

We heard of two incidents recently in which it took 45 minutes for an ambulance to arrive. One man was suffering a severe asthma attack; another man had suffered a broken leg.

 

Dog bites man. In other words, the Parks Department announced there will be a lifeguard shortage.

 

The homicide which occurred last Friday was the first homicide in the 100 Precinct in almost two years. Let’s hope we wait at least two more for the next.

 

If the stretch of boardwalk between 116 street and 109 street is to be finished by Memorial Day (as promised) they’ll have to hustle.

 

Staten Island and Brooklyn will soon be homes to minor league baseball. Meanwhile, there are these 300 acres in Rockaway….We checked with Montreal---nothing new on Technodome.

 

 

 

 

 

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